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FALL - Definiția din dicționar

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Fall (f&asuml_;l), v. i. [imp. Fell (fĕl); p. p. Fallen (f&asuml_;l"'n); p. pr. & vb. n. Falling.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.] 1. To Descend, either suddenly or gradually; particularly, to descend by the force of gravity; to drop; to sink; as, the apple falls; the tide falls; the mercury falls in the barometer.
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I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven. Luke x. 18.
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2. To cease to be erect; to take suddenly a recumbent posture; to become prostrate; to drop; as, a child totters and falls; a tree falls; a worshiper falls on his knees.
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I fell at his feet to worship him. Rev. xix. 10.
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3. To find a final outlet; to discharge its waters; to empty; -- with into; as, the river Rhone falls into the Mediterranean.
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4. To become prostrate and dead; to die; especially, to die by violence, as in battle.
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A thousand shall fall at thy side. Ps. xci. 7.
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He rushed into the field, and, foremost fighting, fell. Byron.
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5. To cease to be active or strong; to die away; to lose strength; to subside; to become less intense; as, the wind falls.
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6. To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; -- said of the young of certain animals. Shak.
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7. To decline in power, glory, wealth, or importance; to become insignificant; to lose rank or position; to decline in weight, value, price etc.; to become less; as, the price falls; stocks fell two points.
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I am a poor fallen man, unworthy now
To be thy lord and master.
Shak.
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The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished. Sir J. Davies.
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8. To be overthrown or captured; to be destroyed.
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Heaven and earth will witness,
If Rome must fall, that we are innocent.
Addison.
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9. To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin; to depart from the faith; to apostatize; to sin.
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Let us labor therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief. Heb. iv. 11.
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10. To become insnared or embarrassed; to be entrapped; to be worse off than before; as, to fall into error; to fall into difficulties.
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11. To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; -- said of the countenance.
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Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell. Gen. iv. 5.
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I have observed of late thy looks are fallen. Addison.
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12. To sink; to languish; to become feeble or faint; as, our spirits rise and fall with our fortunes.
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13. To pass somewhat suddenly, and passively, into a new state of body or mind; to become; as, to fall asleep; to fall into a passion; to fall in love; to fall into temptation.
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14. To happen; to to come to pass; to light; to befall; to issue; to terminate.
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The Romans fell on this model by chance. Swift.
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Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall. Ruth. iii. 18.
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They do not make laws, they fall into customs. H. Spencer.
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15. To come; to occur; to arrive.
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The vernal equinox, which at the Nicene Council fell on the 21st of March, falls now [1694] about ten days sooner. Holder.
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16. To begin with haste, ardor, or vehemence; to rush or hurry; as, they fell to blows.
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They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul. Jowett (Thucyd. ).
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17. To pass or be transferred by chance, lot, distribution, inheritance, or otherwise; as, the estate fell to his brother; the kingdom fell into the hands of his rivals.
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18. To belong or appertain.
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If to her share some female errors fall,
Look on her face, and you'll forget them all.
Pope.
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19. To be dropped or uttered carelessly; as, an unguarded expression fell from his lips; not a murmur fell from him.
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To fall abroad of (Naut.), to strike against; -- applied to one vessel coming into collision with another. -- To fall among, to come among accidentally or unexpectedly. -- To fall astern (Naut.), to move or be driven backward; to be left behind; as, a ship falls astern by the force of a current, or when outsailed by another. -- To fall away. (a) To lose flesh; to become lean or emaciated; to pine. (b) To renounce or desert allegiance; to revolt or rebel. (c) To renounce or desert the faith; to apostatize.These . . . for a while believe, and in time of temptation fall away.” Luke viii. 13. (d) To perish; to vanish; to be lost.How . . . can the soul . . . fall away into nothing?” Addison. (e) To decline gradually; to fade; to languish, or become faint.One color falls away by just degrees, and another rises insensibly.” Addison. -- To fall back. (a) To recede or retreat; to give way. (b) To fail of performing a promise or purpose; not to fulfill. -- To fall back upon or To fall back on. (a) (Mil.) To retreat for safety to (a stronger position in the rear, as to a fort or a supporting body of troops). (b) To have recourse to (a reserved fund, a more reliable alternative, or some other available expedient or support). -- To fall calm, to cease to blow; to become calm. -- To fall down. (a) To prostrate one's self in worship.All kings shall fall down before him.” Ps. lxxii. 11. (b) To sink; to come to the ground.Down fell the beauteous youth.” Dryden. (c) To bend or bow, as a suppliant. (d) (Naut.) To sail or drift toward the mouth of a river or other outlet. -- To fall flat, to produce no response or result; to fail of the intended effect; as, his speech fell flat. -- To fall foul of. (a) (Naut.) To have a collision with; to become entangled with (b) To attack; to make an assault upon. -- To fall from, to recede or depart from; not to adhere to; as, to fall from an agreement or engagement; to fall from allegiance or duty. -- To fall from grace (M. E. Ch.), to sin; to withdraw from the faith. -- To fall home (Ship Carp.), to curve inward; -- s